PLEASE HELP! INFO NEEDED: ARCHITECT VS INTERIOR ARCHITECT??

Discussion among students of architecture, planning, interiors, landscape, and environmental design. Occasional contributions by lurking design professionals.

Postby KryFreeman » Thu Jul 08, 2010 4:21 pm

teamjdc wrote:In the US there's no such thing as an interior architect.

You're either an architect or you're not.


Since this is a patently false statement and this forum's purpose is to educate and share knowledge, I'm going to beat a dead horse here.

Here is the U.S. Department of Education's definition of Interior Architecture which is classified under "Architecture and related services:"
http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2002/cip2000/cip2000.asp?CIP2=04.0501

And, for comparative reference, its definition of Interior Design which is classified under "Visual and Performing Arts:"
http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2002/cip2000/cip2000.asp?CIP2=50.0408

Here's the American Institute of Architecture's page on Interior Architecture:
http://www.aia.org/practicing/groups/kc/AIAS076039

Here are some US schools with Interior Architecture programs, each with good (but sometimes differing) definitions of IA:

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
Master of Interior Architecture
https://www.uclaextension.edu/arc_ID/r/curriculum.aspx

Academy of Art University, San Francisco
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Architecture and Design
http://www.- abuse by evil forum spammers -.edu/interior-design-school/index.html

University of California, Davis
http://design.ucdavis.edu/undergraduate/interior.html

Woodbury University
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Architecture
http://mcd.woodbury.edu/interiorarchitecture/

Columbia College Chicago
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Architecture
http://www.colum.edu/Academics/Art_and_Design/Programs/Interior%20BFA/index.php

The School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Bachelor of Interior Architecture
http://www.saic.edu/degrees_resources/departments/aiado/index.html

Kansas State University
Bachelor of Interior Architecture,
Master of Interior Architecture and Product Design
http://www.capd.ksu.edu/iapd/

University of Louisville
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Architecture
http://louisville.edu/art/interior-architecture/interior-architecture.html

Lawrence Technological University
Bachelor of Interior Architecture
http://www.ltu.edu/architecture_and_design/art_Design/bia.asp

University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Bachelor of Science in Interior Architecture
http://architecture.unlv.edu/programs_interiors.htm

University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Bachelor of Science in Interior Architecture
http://www.uncg.edu/iar/

Ohio University
http://www.ohio.edu/design/main.html

University of Oregon
Bachelor or Master of Interior Architecture
http://architecture.uoregon.edu/index.cfm?mode=programs&page=intarch

Rhode Island School of Design
Master of Interior Architecture
http://www.risd.edu/graduate_interior.cfm
Bachelor of Interior Architecture
http://www.risd.edu/interiorarch.cfm

Chatham University,
Master of Interior Architecture
http://www.chatham.edu/academics/programs/graduate/mia/

University of Wisconsin
Bachelor of Arts / B.S. in Interior Architecture
http://www.uwsp.edu/ia/

Here is a scholarly discussion about Interior Architecture and its relationship with and to Interior Design and Architecture.
http://www.di.net/articles/archive/2257/

Interior Architecture does exist in the US and any claim to the contrary cannot be credible.
KryFreeman
 
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Postby teamjdc » Tue Jul 13, 2010 6:37 pm

teamjdc wrote:In the US there's no such thing as an interior architect.

You're either an architect or you're not.

KryFreeman wrote:
Since this is a patently false statement and this forum's purpose is to educate and share knowledge, I'm going to beat a dead horse here.



Wow. Patently false.

Educate and share knowledge? If your definition of education and sharing knowledge is spewing crap, the by all means.

So educate me, name one state. Just one. That has such a thing as an interior architect license.

While you're at it, and since you won't be able to, name one state, again, just one, that does not allow architects (the legitimate kind) to do interiors.

Good luck with that.


KryFreeman wrote:

Here is the U.S. Department of Education's definition of Interior Architecture which is classified under "Architecture and related services:"

WTF does that have to do with licensing and reality?


KryFreeman wrote:

And, for comparative reference, its definition of Interior Design which is classified under "Visual and Performing Arts:"


Nice. Interior design. Yep can we do that too.


KryFreeman wrote:
Here's the American Institute of Architecture's page on Interior Architecture:


A subset of ARCHITECTS. You'll find similar groups for healthcare, education, churches.... name it.

Are you going to "educate" the forum on how those are all separate disciplines too?

KryFreeman wrote:
Here are some US schools with Interior Architecture programs, each with good (but sometimes differing) definitions of IA:



What do degree offerings prove?

KryFreeman wrote:
Here is a scholarly discussion about Interior Architecture and its relationship with and to Interior Design and Architecture.
http://www.di.net/articles/archive/2257/

Interior Architecture does exist in the US and any claim to the contrary cannot be credible.

Who said it didn't exist? Are you really that dense?

I said that there's no such thing as an interior architect as separate and distinct from all other architects.

Sure, some architects specialize. The point is any one of us can specialize in interiors if we chose to. But we are all equally licensed to do the same work.

There is no NAAB-accredited degeee in interior architecture. You get a BArch, MArch or DArch. That's it. We all take the same exam.

And I have to go back to these gems...


KryFreeman wrote: There's no reason not to call yourself an architect socially, ..... ....You can call yourself an architect as long as you are not advertising your services as an architect, stamping plans, or the "Architect of record." of a project... ...
....I can call myself a designer in the US, but not an architect (at least until I finish my M.Arch).
.


You're seriously misguided. Have you read a single state law?

The worst thing anyone hoping to get licensed can do is piss off their board and breaking the law is a great way to do it. You may even be disqualified.

Please let us know if and when you do get that MArch so that I can let your board know they have to keep an eye on you.

Sorry to everyone else, but this nut is clueless.

Please, all students with any thought of ever being a licensed architect...

You may not call yourself an architect in any state, under any circumstances, unless you're licensed.

Furthermore, you may only call yourself an architect when you're licensed in the state you are in at the moment. (and I'm not talking about freeman's state of denial)

Yes starkca, I'm angry. I'm angry about all the unlicensed hacks illegally marketing architectural services. Sometimes I think I get even angrier at dimwits spreading misinformation to students.
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Postby KryFreeman » Tue Jul 13, 2010 10:38 pm

You really have a hard-on for this, don't you? Not once have I brought up licensing for interior architects. The OP wanted to know the difference between Arch, IA, and ID specifically in regards to degree programs. ID or IA seemed to fit what he/she was interested in, and you pissed all over it by throwing licensing in for Architecture when that wasn't even relevant to the OP. I never once said, "Get an IA degree, then go ahead and practice interior architecture." And I never once said, "Oh you need an IA or ID degree because architects can't design interiors." Pure architecture was the wrong program for this person since he/she had no interest in structures and exteriors, but the OP liked decorating the interior and drawing plans, and doing more than just choosing pillows and shams, so IA programs in school are a happy medium. And, I am presuming that the OP would be smart enough that after attending school, he/she would understand that there is no license for IA specifically, but would need to turn to the NCIDQ.

Now, let's continue our pissing contest.

teamjdc wrote:In the US there's no such thing as an interior architect.
You're either an architect or you're not.


Google. Heard of it? Learn it.

Hey look, here's a company in the US with offices in 12 major cities which specializes in interior architecture. Gosh, they even named themselves "Interior Architects!"
http://www.interiorarchitects.com/
Someone else with Interior Architecture in their firm's name
http://www.ageloff.com/

Wow, here's mention of an IA practice within an architecture company. Now, I wonder what their business cards say.
http://www.allbusiness.com/finance-insurance-real-estate/real-estate/4410996-1.html

Hey, look, here are some job listings looking for, say it with me now, Interior Architects:
http://tinyurl.com/29sjy43
http://archinect.com/jobs/description.php?id=99654_0_30_0_C
http://tinyurl.com/3ya4uyh
http://tinyurl.com/256wfcq
http://tinyurl.com/2d6bu5v

Gee, here's a salary survey of people who consider themselves to be Interior Architects
http://www.glassdoor.com/Salaries/interior-architect-salary-SRCH_KO0,18.htm

Do you really want to still insist that there's no such thing as an interior architect in the US? Now, if you want to rephrase that into, "There is no officially sanctioned license for Interior Architecture," well, I can get behind that.

teamjdc wrote:
KryFreeman wrote:
Interior Architecture does exist in the US and any claim to the contrary cannot be credible.

Who said it didn't exist? Are you really that dense?


You did, bub, read your own quote, which you conveniently added at the top of your own rant..
In fact, let's quote you again, so you can read what you wrote.

teamjdc wrote:In the US there's no such thing as an interior architect.
You're either an architect or you're not.


teamjdc wrote:I said that there's no such thing as an interior architect as separate and distinct from all other architects.


Actually, no, that would have been clearer. Your "no such thing statement" implied a very common ignorant attitude among people who feel threatened by the existence of specialized competition. This rant would not have been necessary. If you are going to get picky with my wording you need to check yours.

teamjdc wrote:And I have to go back to these gems...

KryFreeman wrote: There's no reason not to call yourself an architect socially, ..... ....You can call yourself an architect as long as you are not advertising your services as an architect, stamping plans, or the "Architect of record." of a project... ...
....I can call myself a designer in the US, but not an architect (at least until I finish my M.Arch).
.


You're seriously misguided. Have you read a single state law?


I have, have you? Perhaps I should ask, "Do you understand what you read?"
Under California's Architects Practice Act, section 5536 paragraph (a) which can be downloaded from here
http://www.cab.ca.gov/board/legislation_regulation.shtml
it states quite clearly that you cannot practice architecture or "put out any sign, card, or other device that might indicate to the public that he or she is an architect, that he or she is qualified to engage in the practice of architecture, or that he or she is an architectural designer." BUT it says nothing about telling others verbally you are an architect if they ask what you do. In fact, by specifying signs, cards or devices, it clearly intends written communication as a no-no, but makes no provision for verbal communication. So, I stand by my statements from March 6 in this thread that if you're at a party you can call yourself an architect, but I will add that if they ask you to design something for them, that you should clarify your license status and refer them to someone licensed if appropriate (however, if you refer to section 5538 in that same document, you can clearly see that anyone, and I do mean anyone can "furnish... data" for "nonstructural store front or interior alterations" - as long as you abide by section 5536). I'm sure other states have similar laws, but you only asked if I read a single state law.

Feel free to apologize for being wrong.

I never once said, "Upon completion of my M. Arch I will open up a storefront with 'KryFreeman, Architectural services'" or any variation thereof. In fact, my very next post clarified the initial statement since you started foaming at the mouth.

teamjdc wrote:You may not call yourself an architect in any state, under any circumstances, unless you're licensed.

Furthermore, you may only call yourself an architect when you're licensed in the state you are in at the moment. (and I'm not talking about freeman's state of denial)

Change "call yourself an architect" to "practice architecture" and we are in agreement.

Frankly, you're being narrow. If you travel to a conference in Las Vegas or Florida and exchange business cards with the word Architect on it and tell people you're an architect, are you in violation? Of course not, because it has your office address on which clearly states your practice's location. If Renzo Piano drives to New Jersey to give an interview, can he no longer refer to himself as an Architect? When Santiago Calatrava traveled to Milwaukee and gave his watercolor presentation to the selection committee for the Art Museum, I'm quite sure no one said, "Hey, you're not licensed in WI, get out."

The fact is, you can work in any state you want AS LONG AS you have an "architect of record" licensed in the state where the project is and it is clear to everyone involved that you are not officially licensed in that state as an architect. The contract will have the officially licensed firm's name on it. For example, Calatrava's addition to the MAM has a dude named David Kahler as the architect of record, but you rarely hear his name when people talk about the addition. And Renzo Piano's Cal Academy redux in San Francisco is always referred to as his, yet the architect of record is a company called Stantec. In fact, on the Cal Academy web page, it clearly states Piano's an architect and lists him above Stantec.

Now, you can probably validly argue that Calatrava and Piano were not the architects, and merely designers working in collaboration with actual locally licensed architects, but your position is
teamjdc wrote:You may not call yourself an architect in any state, under any circumstances, unless you're licensed.

...and that's clearly not true in all circumstances.
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Postby WalkerARCHITECTS » Mon Jul 26, 2010 1:47 pm

ARCHITECTURE is typically poor if it does not embody wholeness. Architects should always aspire to control all aspects of the work to optimize for the best possible harmonious and unified gestalt. The interior designer is a consultant. Architects and architecture must aspire to achieve the most unified expression where the place, the site, the plan, the elevations, the interior, exterior & every detail is worked together by an individual or a team to achieve a whole. This is particularly true when a compound with multiple buildings are designed, such as a University campus or a research institute. To divide the work that an architect does into specialized pieces such as interior or exterior does not serve architecture well. There is no such thing as an interior architect. To be blunt you must master the entire discipline including the tectonics, there should be no exception.

If you wish to do only interiors, study interior design, but typically you will not use the word "architect" as in "Interior Architect" because this word connotes a "licensed professional". Use of the word automatically implies licensing.
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Postby CaliforniaArchitectCE.com » Wed Dec 08, 2010 7:50 pm

Very well said Walker.
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